The Paris Agreement of 2015 sets out a global framework to limit global warming to well below 2°C, preferably to 1.5°C (degrees Celsius), compared to pre-industrial levels. To achieve this global temperature goal, countries aim to reduce growth of greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible and rapid reductions thereafter, based on the best available science, economic and social feasibility.

The effects of climate change are already well visible by increasing air temperatures, melting glaciers and decreasing polar ice caps, rising sea levels, increasing desertification, as well as by more frequent extreme weather events such as heat waves, droughts, floods and storms. Climate change is not globally uniform and affects some regions more than others. On the following diagrams, you can see how climate change has already affected the region of Ashburn during the past 40 years. The data source used is ERA5, the fifth generation ECMWF atmospheric reanalysis of the global climate, covering the time range from 1979 to 2021, with a spatial resolution of 30 km.

Yearly Temperature Change Ashburn

The top graph shows an estimate of the mean annual temperature for the larger region of Ashburn. The dashed blue line is the linear climate change trend. If the trend line is going up from left to right, the temperature trend is positive and it is getting warmer in Ashburn due to climate change. If it is horizontal, no clear trend is seen, and if it is going down, conditions in Ashburn are becoming colder over time.

In the lower part the graph shows the so called warming stripes. Each coloured stripe represents the average temperature for a year - blue for colder and red for warmer years.

Yearly Precipitation Change - Ashburn

The top graph shows an estimate of mean total precipitation for the larger region of Ashburn. The dashed blue line is the linear climate change trend. If the trend line is going up from left to right, the precipitation trend is positive and it is getting wetter in Ashburn due to climate change. If it is horizontal, no clear trend is seen and if it is going down conditions are becoming drier in Ashburn over time.

In the lower part the graph shows the so called precipitation stripes. Each coloured stripe represents the total precipitation of a year - green for wetter and brown for drier years.

Monthly Anomalies of Temperature and Precipitation - Climate Change Ashburn

The top graph shows the temperature anomaly for every month since 1979 up to now. The anomaly tells you by how much it was warmer or colder than the 30 year climate mean of 1980-2010. Thus, red months were warmer and blue months were colder than normal. In most locations, you will find an increase of warmer months over the years, which reflects the global warming associated with climate change.

The lower graph shows the precipitation anomaly for every month since 1979 up to now. The anomaly tells you if a month had more or less precipitation than the 30 year climate mean of 1980-2010. Thus, green months were wetter and brown months were drier than normal.

Climate Change - Ashburn Temperature and precipitation anomaly by month

This graph focuses on the specified month. If you select e.g. August, then the temperature and precipitation anomaly for every August since 1979 are shown. Thereby, you can see in which years August was warmer or colder (drier or wetter) than normal.

More weather data